5 Picks from the London Literature Festival

The London Literature Festival (Monday 28 September 2015 – Monday 12 October 2015) is nearly here and with my new London base I’ve got the time and inclination to see a bit of it–in between writing for my new course, of course.

1. Inside the Head of Terry Gilliam

Inside the Head of Terry Gilliam

There are still tickets to see Terry Gilliam. I repeat, there are still tickets to see Terry Gilliam. Phew, glad I got that out of my system. Being raised on Monty Python and later, falling in love with 12 Monkeys there was no way I was missing out on the chance to spend a few hours listening to this creative genius.

You can still book tickets on the Southbank Centre website.

2. New Experimentalists: The Writers

New Experimentalists: The Writers

‘Meet the novelists who are breathing new life into the form,’ declares the event page. Given I’ve been encouraged to up the amount of new writing in my weekly diet of books, experimental new writing should score some extra brownie points. Paul Kingsnorth, Max Porter and graphic novelist Una are in attendance.

Book tickets for New Experimentalists: The Writers.

3. Pop-Up Talks

Pop-up Talks

So this is technically cheating, because there are several pop-up talks across the festival but they’re all free, so I think this makes up for my stretching the rules. The talks I’m looking forward to include Madsen Pirie’s ‘How to Win Every Argument’ (I need some of this), 7pm on Tuesday 29th September, Jami Attenberg’s ‘Tell me something I don’t know about the streets of NYC in the 1940s’, 5.30pm on Saturday 19th October and Andy Brunning’s ‘Why Does Asparagus Make Your Wee Smell? And 57 Other Curious Food and Drink Questions’, 3pm on Sunday 11th October.

4. The Heart of the Matter: How Science Borrows from Poetry

Heart of the Matter: How Science Borrows from Poetry
The interplay of science and creativity is a subject that I last explored after Frank Wilczek’s talk On a Beautiful Universe and something that continues to fascinate me. So I’ll be interested to see what theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli has to add to the debate as he explores how scientists have borrowed from poets to explain their discoveries.

Book tickets for The Heart of the Matter: How Science Borrows from Poetry.

5. Bending Time: Jenny Erpenbeck in conversation with Maureen FreelyBending Time: Jenny Erpenbeck in conversation with Maureen Freely

German novelist Jenny Erpenbeck is in conversation talking about her sixth novel, The End of Days, which explores four possible lives of a woman born into a Jewish household in Austro-Hungary at the start of the 20th century. I’m going to try and squeeze a read of this in before the talk on the 4th October.

Book tickets for Bending Time: Jenny Erpenbeck in conversation with Maureen Freely.

All images courtesy of the Southbank Centre.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s